Scottish Roots & Scotland’s People

I finally gave in and signed up for ScotlandsPeople in order to search and view the documents, hoping to gain more information on my Scottish ancestors. The way this site works is they let you “search” for people but do not allow you to view the results without payment, only allowing you to see how many results are in which category. You have to purchase credits (30 credits for about $11) to see any details . It costs one credit to view the actual search results, and another 5 credits to view the document.

My overall thoughts of this website, while comprehensive and vast, is not worth the price. I do not like their style of payment and would rather pay a flat fee to view as many documents as I want. Because of this, I was not able to explore as I wished to see if I could find new people. Instead I confirmed a couple dates and relations I already knew, though I did find a father for someone. Also, I thought this site would provide more  detailed and substantial information that I have found elsewhere, but other than occupation, the same information could be found for free on FamilySearch.

My conclusion: only pay for this site if looking to view the actual documents of information you already know.

With that said, here is what I did find:

The parish birth records for Burton Thoms

The parish birth records for Burton Thoms

The records states that Burton Thoms was born to William Thoms (who was a weaver) and Isabella Anderson in Dundee on January 15, 1803 and christened January 23, 1803 (there are two dates listed, one next to the father and one next to the mother; as the first is always earlier than the latter, I assume this is the birth and christening dates).

The parish records for the marriage of Burton Thoms and Jean Strachan

The parish records for the marriage of Burton Thoms and Jean Strachan

On the 13th of March, 1825, Burton Thoms, weaver, and Jean, daughter of William Strachan, weaver, were married, both in this parish [Dundee].

The Origin of the Bogues

Henry Bogue Sr. was born in County Fermanagh, Ulster, Ireland (now Northern Ireland) in 1767.  He married a woman named Margaret who was born about 1782 in Ireland. Together they had 6 children: John, Henry Jr., Robert, William, Mary Ann, and Catherine. Margaret immigrated to the United States with her six children in 1825. They arrived at the Port of Baltimore between April 1st and June 30th. Margaret would have had someone to meet them in the new world, to set up a house/farm/homestead, but I do not know at this point who that was. You would assume it was her husband, but according to the Tithe Applotment, there was a Henry Bogue in Tatnabuddagh, Aghalurcher, Co. Fernmanagh in 1833. Whether this is the same Henry or not, there is no way to know right now. It is possible that Margaret was meeting another family member or that Henry met them, then returned to Ireland for a period of time. The one connecting factor between Margaret’s Henry and the one listed in the Tithe book is that being listed in the Tithe Applotment Books means he occupied agricultural land and John Bogue (Henry and Margaret’s son) was listed as a farmer on the passenger list. Not a strong connection, but there it is.

Henry Sr. died December 13, 1863 (age 96, a remarkable feat for that time period) and Margaret December 6, 1832 (age 50).  They are buried in New Cathedral Cemetery in Baltimore.

It is harder to uncover any further ancestors due to Irish records before the 1900s being mostly destroyed or never existing. Any records that do exist would be with parish records (baptismal and marriage records), graveyard, or family members and I don’t have access to any of these.

In my research of the Bogue surname, I came across a book written in 1944 called Bogue and Allied Families by Virgil T. Bogue. While there are no connecting ancestors listed, the history of the surname is interesting. It seems that the Bogues are originally from Scotland. During the reformation, many of them became protestant. To escape persecution, many fled from Scotland to America. Those who still held to the Roman Catholic faith fled to Ireland. (The Bogues in my family are buried in a Catholic cemetery, so I believe they were Catholic).

It is also believed that there are two separate Bogue lines within Ireland. There are those Bogues I just described, descended from Scots settled in and around Co. Fermanagh, and then there are those who live around Co. Cork. These Bogues are believed to be purely of Irish descent and of a mainly Catholic persuasion, whereas the other line has a stronger protestant leaning.

Henry Bogue Jr. made quite a name for himself as he is listed in books amongst other prominent Marylanders. Sadly, he is not my direct ancestor so I will save his story for another post along with photographs of the gravestones from New Cathedral.