Unknown Children

I have a few pictures that I don’t know who is in them. All I know is that they are from my mom’s side of the family. I can roughly date this one to about 1905-1915, judging by the large hair bow (a very popular accessory for young girls, it seems, as I have quite a few photos of girls wearing these) and the…interesting…haircuts. The two oldest are girls, and a young boy stands in the middle. I would guess their ages to range from about 4-7 years old. 

If any of my relatives are reading this and know who they are, speak up!

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How many degrees of separation to FDR?

I’m not very good at figuring out how many degrees of separation there are between me and someone, but this one is definitely less than the required six degrees.

Pictured below is Herbert Romulus O’Conor with President Franklin D. Roosevelt, taken sometime in the 1940s. I always seem to come across new photos when using Google from time to time. This one is from the Baltimore Sun.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O'Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O’Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

Maryland’s wartime governor, Herbert Romulus O’Conor, a Democrat (right), was the fourth Roman Catholic to be elected to the governorship and the first of Irish descent. He was born in 1896 in Baltimore and raised on Homewood Avenue in the old Irish 10th Ward.

 
He was a graduate of Loyola High School and, in 1917, from what is now Loyola University Maryland. After graduating from the University of Maryland Law School in 1920, O’Conor was appointed an assistant state’s attorney for Baltimore, and then served a decade as state’s attorney for Baltimore City.

 
In 1934, he was elected attorney general, and governor four years later, easily beating the incumbent Harry W. Nice. In addition to serving as the state’s leader during World War II, O’Conor initiated the construction of bridges over the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers as well as the purchase of the Claiborne-Annapolis ferry route.

 
O’Conor created the Commission on Post War Reconstruction in 1944, which conducted public works programs and built highways and public buildings. The next year, he founded the Medical Care program which provided health care for those who were needy.

 
He successfully ran for the U.S. Senate seat that was held by George L. Radcliffe in 1946, and retired in 1953, when he returned to the private practice of law. He was 63 when he died in 1960, and was buried in New Cathedral Cemetery.

Quoted from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bal-oconor-20031209,0,1906444.photo

James Joseph Lacy

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau/108361452/in/photostream/)

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau)

James Joseph Lacy, my three-times great grandfather, was born on August 20, 1840 County Cork, Ireland. He founded the Lacy Foundry (then known as he James J. Lacy Company) that seems to be still in operation today, and still run by Lacy’s. He died December 23, 1913.

Below is his obituary: (Sorry for any incorrect words or names; the original is very hard to read)

James J. Lacy Dead

Head of Iron Works Victim of Asthma at Home

James J. Lacy, president of the James J. Lacy Company, industrial iron works, dies of asthma at 10:40 o’clock last night at his home, 2032 East Baltimore street.

For a week Mr. Lacy had suffered considerably, but his death was not expected so soon. He had a sinking spell in the early evening and the Rev. James F. Donahue, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, was summoned to the home to administer extreme unction. Mr. Lacy ws surrounded by members of his family and was conscious almost to the end.

Mrs. Catherine Lacy, his wife, died a year and a half ago in the same way as her husband – sitting in a chair. They celebratd the golden anniversary of their wedding only a few days before her death.

Born in County Cork, Ireland, Mr. Lacy was a son of James Lacy, who brought his family to this country when the younger Lacy was only a year old. Mr. Lacy was educated at St. Vincent’s School and started his business in early life. With five others he founded the firm of which he was head 45 years ago and was actively in charge of the business until a few days ago. He ws the youngest member of the original firm and the last to die. The others were Patrick Rigner, Michael McMahon, W. R. Beatty, William Jordan and William C. Corner.

Deeply interested in his home and his church, Mr. Lacy spent little time else where, except at his business. He was a member of he Elks and the Hibernian Society. He had a summer home on the __ __ Catonsville. He is survived by four children, Joseph J. Lacy, Miss Lee Lacy, Mrs. J. E. Bradly and Mrs. C. F. Butterfield: 12 grandchildren, one brother Harry F. Lacy of Washington, and a sister, Mrs. Joanna Whearett.

Below is the original obituary:

1913 Obit – James Joseph Lacy

Salvatore and Maria Maggio

EDIT: I have just found out that the picture I had up is actual of a different couple, not the Maggios. I will have another post later about that couple and repost the picture then.

This is one of my favorite photos, and probably the oldest. Judging by the clothes, we can determine is falls into the Victorian era, specifically the bustle era, the 1880s. It is clearly a wedding photograph, with the bride wearing a long veil. While Queen Victoria did make it fashionable to where a white wedding dress, many women still wore the customary dark dress. This was a practical choice – their best dress, if dark, could be worn both at their wedding and when in morning (plus, my personal opinion, it hides dirt better).

Judging by the time period, the occasion, and knowing it comes from my mother’s side of the family, our best guess is that this is a picture of Salvatore Maggio and Maria Grazia Mortillaro. They were married in 1890, at the end of the bustle period. Most people could not afford to buy new clothes when fashions changed, so it is not unusual for the bustle style to be lingering. Clothes were made to last then, and this dress could have been a hand-me-down as well. The man is wearing a typical Prince Albert coat of the period.

Salvatore Maggio (1866-1928) and Maria (1872-1913) were both born in Italy. They were married in 1890, most likely while still living there, had their first child, then immigrated to Baltimore, MD (though it is possible they immigrated first, then married; the details are a but hazy here). Salvatore was a cobbler and then the owner of a confectionery shop while Maria was a homemaker. Together they had seven children, six of which were girls.