A Confederate POW

I came across this little gem of information last night, while doing some more digging into the maternal side of my family. It’s stuff like this that makes me love genealogy.

Isaac Beauchamp Gibson is the son of John Gibson and Sarah “Sally” Ann Acworth. He was born July 28, 1816 in Bay Hundred, Talbot County, Maryland. He died March 9, 1887 in the same location, living his whole life on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Isaac is the first ancestor (my 5th great grand uncle, according to Ancestry; related to the Wooters/Foard line) that I can definitively say was a Confederate sympathizer.

On November 28, 1861 he was taken prisoner the federal government for “assisting recruits for the Rebels to cross into Virginia.” He was held for a little over a month, and was released after taking an Oath of Allegiance.

I can find no evidence that he was a soldier in the Civil, so probably just a civilian doing what he thought was his civic duty.

A Country Divided – But Not a Family

I recently stumbled onto a new piece of information about an ancestor, William P. Cummings – even though he lived and died in Baltimore, he fought in the Civil war for Ohio. I have yet to figure out the reason for this, and I am sure there is one, but it gave me inspiration for a new post.

Listed below are the relative who I know enlisted and those who registered for the draft. Obviously, my family is not full of career soldiers as no one lasted longer than a year. I lied – I just found  new one. I’m sure there are still more to be discovered, but for now, here they are:

Enlistments:

  • JamesO’Conor (1829-1911) [direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 20 Oct 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Sep 1862
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company E, 1st Cavalry Regiment Maryland
  • William Peyton Cummings (1831-1901) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 19 Apr 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company F, Ohio 12th Infantry Regiment
  • John B.Thoms (1837-?) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 17 Jun 1861
    • Discharged: 10 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Ensign
    • Regiment: Company F, 15th New York Engineers
    • Resigned at Fairfax Seminary, VA
  • William Baker Smallwood (1843-1891) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 1861
    • Discharged: Sep 1865
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company A, 1st Maryland Light Artillery; Company B, Maryland Light Artillery

Draft Registration

  • James Joseph Lacy (1840-1913) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jun 1863
  • DanielWooters (1845-1920) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul-Aug 1863
    • Remarks: Currently in service in the 1st Eastern Shore Regiment (this regiment fought in Gettysburg)
  • Gabriel Schaffer
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul 1863
EDIT - 
7/31/14 11:16 PM - added William Baker Smallwood
8/1/14 11:42 PM - added Gabriel Schaffer

How many degrees of separation to FDR?

I’m not very good at figuring out how many degrees of separation there are between me and someone, but this one is definitely less than the required six degrees.

Pictured below is Herbert Romulus O’Conor with President Franklin D. Roosevelt, taken sometime in the 1940s. I always seem to come across new photos when using Google from time to time. This one is from the Baltimore Sun.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O'Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O’Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

Maryland’s wartime governor, Herbert Romulus O’Conor, a Democrat (right), was the fourth Roman Catholic to be elected to the governorship and the first of Irish descent. He was born in 1896 in Baltimore and raised on Homewood Avenue in the old Irish 10th Ward.

 
He was a graduate of Loyola High School and, in 1917, from what is now Loyola University Maryland. After graduating from the University of Maryland Law School in 1920, O’Conor was appointed an assistant state’s attorney for Baltimore, and then served a decade as state’s attorney for Baltimore City.

 
In 1934, he was elected attorney general, and governor four years later, easily beating the incumbent Harry W. Nice. In addition to serving as the state’s leader during World War II, O’Conor initiated the construction of bridges over the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers as well as the purchase of the Claiborne-Annapolis ferry route.

 
O’Conor created the Commission on Post War Reconstruction in 1944, which conducted public works programs and built highways and public buildings. The next year, he founded the Medical Care program which provided health care for those who were needy.

 
He successfully ran for the U.S. Senate seat that was held by George L. Radcliffe in 1946, and retired in 1953, when he returned to the private practice of law. He was 63 when he died in 1960, and was buried in New Cathedral Cemetery.

Quoted from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bal-oconor-20031209,0,1906444.photo

Ghosts of Baltimore

I just had to share this site that my sister recently sent me to: Ghosts of Baltimore. This blog is full of old photos, maps, interesting news articles and tidbits about Baltimore’s history (not about haunted places in Baltimore, which is what I originally thought, haha). Content for the posts is dug up from the depths of The Smithsonian, the Library of Congress, the Baltimore Sun, and various other collections. Most posts are short and sweet, being picture heavy with optional text – just what I like for my historical eye candy.

A few posts that I found interesting:

Baltimore History Traced in Street Names – why streets are named the way they are

Wild Italian Man Dances Naked in the Streets – 1907 (a lack of news that day, I guess)

1857 Map of the City and County of Baltimore – very cool for genealogy purposes – it shows the districts with, what I assume, the landowners/farms

Detailed Map of Guilford From 1926 – much of my dad’s side grew up in this area; has the plot layouts

Daniel Leven Wooters – A Womanizer?

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

This particular part of my grandmother’s side of the family (one of his daughters, Mary Cecelia, married into the Foard family) is a constant headache. And I still don’t think I have it completely figured out. You’ll see why…

Daniel Leven Wooters, Sr., was born about 1845 in Maryland. Over the course of his life, he constantly moved around and had multiple wives and many children. I think he may have had two wives at the same time, at one point, but I don’t know for sure. This is what I do know:

In 1862, he volunteered for the Home Guard in Denton, Maryland at the age of 17. In 1863, he  is listed on the Draft Registration list for military duty during the Civil War. On line 19, his information is listed as follows:

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

  • Residence: Denton
  • Name: Wooters, Danl
  • Age: 21
  • Color: White
  • Occupation: Soldier
  • Single
  • Place of Birth: MD
  • Former Military Service: 1st E.S. Regt
  • Remarks: In Service

On March 24, 1868 Daniel married Sarah Elizabeth Gibson (about 1849-1875) in St. Michael’s, Talbot County, Maryland. They had two children (this where is starts to get complicated – trying to figure out what child belongs to which wife): Ellen Virginia Wooters (1869-1952) and Mary Cecelia Wooters (1873-1935). On the 1870 census for Talbot County, Daniel’s occupation is listed as osytering. Living with them are possibley Sarah’s younger brothers, Richard, William, and Charles.

Sarah died in or about 1875. Daniel remarried not long after on February 17, 1876 to Mary J. Pocock (1857-?). She was 19, and he was 30. Their marriage was filed in Baltimore (unsure if that’s where is took place). Daniel is listed as widowed and his occupation is Stevedore (according to Wikipedia: Stevedore, dockworker, docker, dock laborer, wharfie, and longshoreman can have various waterfront-related meanings concerning loading and unloading ships, according to place and country).

In 1880, the lived at 20 Binney Street in Baltimore. The children listed with them are Mary C. (from previous marriage), Jenny (most likely this is Ellen Virginia; born about the same year [before Mary’s marriage to Daniel]), and Laura M. (born about 1879). Daniel is listed as a laborer and Mary as “working in house pickling.”

The next record I have of Daniel is the 1910 census. Here, he is married to Rose (born about 1880) and they live at 839 William Street, Baltimore. They had been married for 14 years (1896). The children listed on the census with them are: John Albert (born about 1901), Daniel Leven, Jr. (born 1904), Laura Irene (born about 1907), and William Henry (born about 1901). They also had Ethel and Rose Elizabeth (information provided by a descendant of Daniel who described him as a “scoundrel”).

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Daniel died January 11, 1920. He lived at 1920 Sherwood Avenue in Baltimore. He is listed as widowed on his death certificate and is buried in Mount Carmel Cemetery. His father is listed as Daniel R. Wooters and his mother is unknown.

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Whether he had multiple wives at the same time is not known, but what I do know is that he remarried very quickly after his first wife’s death, he liked his wives young (19, 19, and 16 years old), and they don’t seem to have lived very long despite their youth. Hmmm….

I would love to be able to find death certificates or graves for his wives. It would be very interesting.

James Joseph Lacy

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau/108361452/in/photostream/)

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau)

James Joseph Lacy, my three-times great grandfather, was born on August 20, 1840 County Cork, Ireland. He founded the Lacy Foundry (then known as he James J. Lacy Company) that seems to be still in operation today, and still run by Lacy’s. He died December 23, 1913.

Below is his obituary: (Sorry for any incorrect words or names; the original is very hard to read)

James J. Lacy Dead

Head of Iron Works Victim of Asthma at Home

James J. Lacy, president of the James J. Lacy Company, industrial iron works, dies of asthma at 10:40 o’clock last night at his home, 2032 East Baltimore street.

For a week Mr. Lacy had suffered considerably, but his death was not expected so soon. He had a sinking spell in the early evening and the Rev. James F. Donahue, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, was summoned to the home to administer extreme unction. Mr. Lacy ws surrounded by members of his family and was conscious almost to the end.

Mrs. Catherine Lacy, his wife, died a year and a half ago in the same way as her husband – sitting in a chair. They celebratd the golden anniversary of their wedding only a few days before her death.

Born in County Cork, Ireland, Mr. Lacy was a son of James Lacy, who brought his family to this country when the younger Lacy was only a year old. Mr. Lacy was educated at St. Vincent’s School and started his business in early life. With five others he founded the firm of which he was head 45 years ago and was actively in charge of the business until a few days ago. He ws the youngest member of the original firm and the last to die. The others were Patrick Rigner, Michael McMahon, W. R. Beatty, William Jordan and William C. Corner.

Deeply interested in his home and his church, Mr. Lacy spent little time else where, except at his business. He was a member of he Elks and the Hibernian Society. He had a summer home on the __ __ Catonsville. He is survived by four children, Joseph J. Lacy, Miss Lee Lacy, Mrs. J. E. Bradly and Mrs. C. F. Butterfield: 12 grandchildren, one brother Harry F. Lacy of Washington, and a sister, Mrs. Joanna Whearett.

Below is the original obituary:

1913 Obit – James Joseph Lacy

A 1920s Wedding for Ada Maggio

Sorry for the unexpected break in posting; life started getting a little crazy. But don’t worry, he’s a new photo for you!

Ada Maggio

Ada Maggio

Old wedding photos are some of my favorite types, and this one is at the top of my list. Ada Maggio was born in 1906 to Salvatore and Maria Maggio in Maryland. I don’t know much about her except that she was engaged in 1926 to John J. Dantoni.

Standing: Rose Maggio, Connie Russo, Ada Maggio, Lena Maggio, Marie Coreo, unknown | seated - unknown

Standing: Rose Maggio, Connie Russo, Ada Maggio, Lena Maggio, Marie Coreo, unknown | seated – unknown