Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

A happy St. Patrick’s Day to everyone! Especially to all my ancestors who made the long journey from Ireland in the 19th century:

  • John Bogue – arrived 1825, age 16, to Baltimore
  • Margaret (wife of Henry Bogue) – arrived 1825, age 43, to Baltimore
  • Mary Ann (wife of Nicholas Gorman) – arrived 1824-1826, age 26-28, from County Down to Baltimore
  • Nicholas Gorman – arrived 1827, age 48, from County Down to Baltimore
  • Henry Bogue – arrived after 1833, from County Fermanagh
  • John Cummings – arrived 1834, age 8, to Baltimore
  • Alexander Cummings (father of John Cummings) – arrived 1834, age 32, from County Tyrone to Baltimore
  • Mary McKuskey (mother of John Cummings) – arrived 1834, age 35, from County Tyrone to Baltimore
  • Thomas Leland (father of Mary Ellen Leland) – arrived after 1837, from Woodfield, Knockvicar, Co. Roscommon, Ireland
  • Mary Martin (mother of Mary Ellen Leland) – arrived after 1837
  • Patrick F. Collins – arrived before 1840, from County Cork
  • Dorothy “Dolly” Kelly (mother of James O’Conor) – arrived after 1840
  • Michael Loughran – arrived before 1842
  • Bridget Flanagan – arrived before 1842
  • Daniel Hurley – arrived before 1842
  • Maria Ann (wife of John Bogue) – arrived before 1845
  • James Lacy (father of James Joseph Lacy) – arrived 1847-1854, age 29-35, from Kilbrin, County Cork
  • James Joseph Lacy – arrived 1848, age 8, from County Cork to Baltimore
  • Mary Elizabeth Sheehan (mother of James Joseph Lacy) – arrived 1848, age 30, from County Cork to Baltimore
  • Sarah Lee Farrell – arrived 1849, age 9, from County Roscommon to Baltimore
  • Edward Francis Levelle – arrived in 1849, age 11
  • Rose McKeyley (grandmother of John Cummings) – arrived before 1850
  • Mary Josephine O’Connor – arrived 1850-1853, age 5-8, from County Cork
  • William Galvin – arrived 1850-57, age 24-31, from County Galway to Baltimore
  • James O’Conor – arrived 1852, age 23
  • Mary Ellen Leland – arrived 1853, age 16, from County Roscommon

For reference, the Great Famine lasted from 1845-1852, but there were previous failures of the potato crop:

  • 1821-1822 – Munster and Connaught
  • 1830-1831 – Counties Mayo, Donegal, and Galway
  • 1835 – Ulster
  • 1832-1834, 1836-1837, 1839, 1841, 1844 – general crop losses due to dry rot and curl

    The counties of Ireland

A Couple Crazy Connections

Need a little genealogy brain teaser or just something to make you scratch your head or go “ewww.” Well, here you go.

The Gentrys and Levelles have a strange double connections going on. There is not just one marriage to connect the families, but two. Two sisters married a father and son. Weird, huh? Let me break it down for you.

Mary Ellen Levelle, circa 1880s or 90s

Mary Ellen Levelle, circa 1880s or 90s

Mary Ellen and Rose Estelle Levelle were sisters, born about five years apart in Baltimore. Mary was born June 19, 1867 and Rose in March of 1872 (their parents were Edward Francis Levelle and Mary J. Loughran for those keeping track).

Haden Gentry, late 1800s or early 1900s

Haden Gentry, late 1800s or early 1900s

Mary married Haden Gentry (born December 12, 1850 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky) on April 17, 1888 at the age of 20 (Haden was 38). Mary was his second wife. His first wife, Annie Agnes McElroy, died in 1884, leaving behind five children, one of which was Alfred St. John Gentry.

Alfred, born in about 1866 in Baltimore, married Rose in about 1892. He was about 26 and she was 20.

1310 Aisquith Street

1310 Aisquith Street

So Haden Gentry’s sister-in-law was also his daughter-in-law.¬†And they all lived together in a “boarding house” with Mary and Rose’s father and brother (Edward Francis Levelle and Edward Francis Jr.). This arrangement lasted for at least 10 years, with multiple families living together in one house.

This house, in 1900, must have been two townhouses combined (physically or not), because all 14 people are listed for the address 1308 Aisquith Street and there is not a 1310 listed. But then in 1910, only 1310 is listed with a different family occupying 1308 (11 people in a townhouse!) I used to drive by these housed everyday to work and would just wondering what they would have been like 100 years ago.