Updates to Tree – Foard, Smallwood, Seymour

New edits and updates to the tree tonight:

William Richardson Foard, Jr.

  • Added: Residence in 1923 (1902 Sherwood Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1917 (808 Willow St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: WWI Draft card
  • Interesting to note: His birth year listed on WWI draft card (1894) is different than what is on his grave (1893) – I usually lean towards earlier records as the correct date, my theory being that the younger you are, the more likely you are to remember correct dates. Also, information on gravestones is given my a relative or friend and has a higher likelihood of being incorrect.

Edith Smallwood

  • Added: 1900 Census
  • Added: Husband (Frank Zepp) and child (Norman Zepp)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1912, 1921, 1928 (623 St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Middle name initial of “M”

Margaret Seymour

  • Added: 1870, 1900, 1910 Census
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1910 (406 Park Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Marriage date (1871)
  • Added: Occupation – pattern maker

New People Added:

  • Mary E. Seymour Brant
  • William W. Seymour
  • Mary A. Seymour
  • Ella Seymour
  • Estelle Seymour
  • John B. Seymour

To view more details, visit my Ancestry.com tree (link is on the right side column)

MD Historical Society Photos

Here’s another great Baltimore-centric website I’ve come across; it’s run by the former curator of photographs of the  Maryland Historical Society. It consists completely of photographs of buildings or street scenes in Baltimore and the surrounding areas. Many times, the old photos are juxtaposed next to current views of the same location. Check it out:

http://mdhsphotographs.tumblr.com/

Ghosts of Baltimore

I just had to share this site that my sister recently sent me to: Ghosts of Baltimore. This blog is full of old photos, maps, interesting news articles and tidbits about Baltimore’s history (not about haunted places in Baltimore, which is what I originally thought, haha). Content for the posts is dug up from the depths of The Smithsonian, the Library of Congress, the Baltimore Sun, and various other collections. Most posts are short and sweet, being picture heavy with optional text – just what I like for my historical eye candy.

A few posts that I found interesting:

Baltimore History Traced in Street Names – why streets are named the way they are

Wild Italian Man Dances Naked in the Streets – 1907 (a lack of news that day, I guess)

1857 Map of the City and County of Baltimore – very cool for genealogy purposes – it shows the districts with, what I assume, the landowners/farms

Detailed Map of Guilford From 1926 – much of my dad’s side grew up in this area; has the plot layouts

Daniel Leven Wooters – A Womanizer?

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

This particular part of my grandmother’s side of the family (one of his daughters, Mary Cecelia, married into the Foard family) is a constant headache. And I still don’t think I have it completely figured out. You’ll see why…

Daniel Leven Wooters, Sr., was born about 1845 in Maryland. Over the course of his life, he constantly moved around and had multiple wives and many children. I think he may have had two wives at the same time, at one point, but I don’t know for sure. This is what I do know:

In 1862, he volunteered for the Home Guard in Denton, Maryland at the age of 17. In 1863, he  is listed on the Draft Registration list for military duty during the Civil War. On line 19, his information is listed as follows:

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

  • Residence: Denton
  • Name: Wooters, Danl
  • Age: 21
  • Color: White
  • Occupation: Soldier
  • Single
  • Place of Birth: MD
  • Former Military Service: 1st E.S. Regt
  • Remarks: In Service

On March 24, 1868 Daniel married Sarah Elizabeth Gibson (about 1849-1875) in St. Michael’s, Talbot County, Maryland. They had two children (this where is starts to get complicated – trying to figure out what child belongs to which wife): Ellen Virginia Wooters (1869-1952) and Mary Cecelia Wooters (1873-1935). On the 1870 census for Talbot County, Daniel’s occupation is listed as osytering. Living with them are possibley Sarah’s younger brothers, Richard, William, and Charles.

Sarah died in or about 1875. Daniel remarried not long after on February 17, 1876 to Mary J. Pocock (1857-?). She was 19, and he was 30. Their marriage was filed in Baltimore (unsure if that’s where is took place). Daniel is listed as widowed and his occupation is Stevedore (according to Wikipedia: Stevedore, dockworker, docker, dock laborer, wharfie, and longshoreman can have various waterfront-related meanings concerning loading and unloading ships, according to place and country).

In 1880, the lived at 20 Binney Street in Baltimore. The children listed with them are Mary C. (from previous marriage), Jenny (most likely this is Ellen Virginia; born about the same year [before Mary’s marriage to Daniel]), and Laura M. (born about 1879). Daniel is listed as a laborer and Mary as “working in house pickling.”

The next record I have of Daniel is the 1910 census. Here, he is married to Rose (born about 1880) and they live at 839 William Street, Baltimore. They had been married for 14 years (1896). The children listed on the census with them are: John Albert (born about 1901), Daniel Leven, Jr. (born 1904), Laura Irene (born about 1907), and William Henry (born about 1901). They also had Ethel and Rose Elizabeth (information provided by a descendant of Daniel who described him as a “scoundrel”).

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Daniel died January 11, 1920. He lived at 1920 Sherwood Avenue in Baltimore. He is listed as widowed on his death certificate and is buried in Mount Carmel Cemetery. His father is listed as Daniel R. Wooters and his mother is unknown.

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Whether he had multiple wives at the same time is not known, but what I do know is that he remarried very quickly after his first wife’s death, he liked his wives young (19, 19, and 16 years old), and they don’t seem to have lived very long despite their youth. Hmmm….

I would love to be able to find death certificates or graves for his wives. It would be very interesting.

James Joseph Lacy

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau/108361452/in/photostream/)

Water meter cover created by the Lacy Foundry (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/monceau)

James Joseph Lacy, my three-times great grandfather, was born on August 20, 1840 County Cork, Ireland. He founded the Lacy Foundry (then known as he James J. Lacy Company) that seems to be still in operation today, and still run by Lacy’s. He died December 23, 1913.

Below is his obituary: (Sorry for any incorrect words or names; the original is very hard to read)

James J. Lacy Dead

Head of Iron Works Victim of Asthma at Home

James J. Lacy, president of the James J. Lacy Company, industrial iron works, dies of asthma at 10:40 o’clock last night at his home, 2032 East Baltimore street.

For a week Mr. Lacy had suffered considerably, but his death was not expected so soon. He had a sinking spell in the early evening and the Rev. James F. Donahue, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, was summoned to the home to administer extreme unction. Mr. Lacy ws surrounded by members of his family and was conscious almost to the end.

Mrs. Catherine Lacy, his wife, died a year and a half ago in the same way as her husband – sitting in a chair. They celebratd the golden anniversary of their wedding only a few days before her death.

Born in County Cork, Ireland, Mr. Lacy was a son of James Lacy, who brought his family to this country when the younger Lacy was only a year old. Mr. Lacy was educated at St. Vincent’s School and started his business in early life. With five others he founded the firm of which he was head 45 years ago and was actively in charge of the business until a few days ago. He ws the youngest member of the original firm and the last to die. The others were Patrick Rigner, Michael McMahon, W. R. Beatty, William Jordan and William C. Corner.

Deeply interested in his home and his church, Mr. Lacy spent little time else where, except at his business. He was a member of he Elks and the Hibernian Society. He had a summer home on the __ __ Catonsville. He is survived by four children, Joseph J. Lacy, Miss Lee Lacy, Mrs. J. E. Bradly and Mrs. C. F. Butterfield: 12 grandchildren, one brother Harry F. Lacy of Washington, and a sister, Mrs. Joanna Whearett.

Below is the original obituary:

1913 Obit – James Joseph Lacy

A 1920s Wedding for Ada Maggio

Sorry for the unexpected break in posting; life started getting a little crazy. But don’t worry, he’s a new photo for you!

Ada Maggio

Ada Maggio

Old wedding photos are some of my favorite types, and this one is at the top of my list. Ada Maggio was born in 1906 to Salvatore and Maria Maggio in Maryland. I don’t know much about her except that she was engaged in 1926 to John J. Dantoni.

Standing: Rose Maggio, Connie Russo, Ada Maggio, Lena Maggio, Marie Coreo, unknown | seated - unknown

Standing: Rose Maggio, Connie Russo, Ada Maggio, Lena Maggio, Marie Coreo, unknown | seated – unknown

A Couple Crazy Connections

Need a little genealogy brain teaser or just something to make you scratch your head or go “ewww.” Well, here you go.

The Gentrys and Levelles have a strange double connections going on. There is not just one marriage to connect the families, but two. Two sisters married a father and son. Weird, huh? Let me break it down for you.

Mary Ellen Levelle, circa 1880s or 90s

Mary Ellen Levelle, circa 1880s or 90s

Mary Ellen and Rose Estelle Levelle were sisters, born about five years apart in Baltimore. Mary was born June 19, 1867 and Rose in March of 1872 (their parents were Edward Francis Levelle and Mary J. Loughran for those keeping track).

Haden Gentry, late 1800s or early 1900s

Haden Gentry, late 1800s or early 1900s

Mary married Haden Gentry (born December 12, 1850 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky) on April 17, 1888 at the age of 20 (Haden was 38). Mary was his second wife. His first wife, Annie Agnes McElroy, died in 1884, leaving behind five children, one of which was Alfred St. John Gentry.

Alfred, born in about 1866 in Baltimore, married Rose in about 1892. He was about 26 and she was 20.

1310 Aisquith Street

1310 Aisquith Street

So Haden Gentry’s sister-in-law was also his daughter-in-law. And they all lived together in a “boarding house” with Mary and Rose’s father and brother (Edward Francis Levelle and Edward Francis Jr.). This arrangement lasted for at least 10 years, with multiple families living together in one house.

This house, in 1900, must have been two townhouses combined (physically or not), because all 14 people are listed for the address 1308 Aisquith Street and there is not a 1310 listed. But then in 1910, only 1310 is listed with a different family occupying 1308 (11 people in a townhouse!) I used to drive by these housed everyday to work and would just wondering what they would have been like 100 years ago.