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A German in the Family?!

My grandmother always prided herself on her Irish heritage. As far as anyone knew, she was Irish through and through. Her house was decorated in shades of green, leprechauns and shamrocks scattered the window sills, and an Irish flag hung proudly out front. We grew up hearing stories of how her family was “lace-curtain” Irish and celebrating St. Patrick’s Day as the holiest day of the year. She is, unfortunately, no longer with us, but even if she was, I don’t think she would believe me if I told her she had German blood in her (and English too, for the record).

Jemima C. Mumper is my 4xgreat grandmother. She was born in Pennsylvania in about 1826 and was married to Peter A. Magers (this is where the English comes in). Jemima was the daughter of Abraham Mumper, Esq. and Mary Lerew. Abraham’s paternal grandparents were born in Ochsenbach, Baden-Württemberg, in what is now known as Germany. This area is located in south-west Germany, bordering France and Switzerland.

George Michael Mumper, also known as Jerg Michael Momber/Mannber, was born January 23, 1723. He immigrated to the new world in 1751. He married (whether before or after immigrating, I’m not sure) Anna Margretha, who was also born in Ochsenbach in about 1719. Together, they had two children, Michael and Anna Christina. George Michael died February 23, 1807 in Franklin, PA, outliving his wife who died August 15, 1795.

Abraham Mumper’s maternal side of the family are Burkholders, hailing from Switzerland, not far from the German border. I have not done much of my own research into this branch, so I will save this for another day.

But back to the Mumpers…The Mumpers were a prominent family in Pennsylvania, settling in the York county area. They had sizable farms and were involved in local politics and going-ons. Iron ore was discovered less than a mile away from on of the Mumper farms. I’m not going to get into details (mostly because I only skimmed the text) but if you want to read more, see The History of York County Pennsylvania.

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