How many degrees of separation to FDR?

I’m not very good at figuring out how many degrees of separation there are between me and someone, but this one is definitely less than the required six degrees.

Pictured below is Herbert Romulus O’Conor with President Franklin D. Roosevelt, taken sometime in the 1940s. I always seem to come across new photos when using Google from time to time. This one is from the Baltimore Sun.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O'Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O’Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

Maryland’s wartime governor, Herbert Romulus O’Conor, a Democrat (right), was the fourth Roman Catholic to be elected to the governorship and the first of Irish descent. He was born in 1896 in Baltimore and raised on Homewood Avenue in the old Irish 10th Ward.

 
He was a graduate of Loyola High School and, in 1917, from what is now Loyola University Maryland. After graduating from the University of Maryland Law School in 1920, O’Conor was appointed an assistant state’s attorney for Baltimore, and then served a decade as state’s attorney for Baltimore City.

 
In 1934, he was elected attorney general, and governor four years later, easily beating the incumbent Harry W. Nice. In addition to serving as the state’s leader during World War II, O’Conor initiated the construction of bridges over the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers as well as the purchase of the Claiborne-Annapolis ferry route.

 
O’Conor created the Commission on Post War Reconstruction in 1944, which conducted public works programs and built highways and public buildings. The next year, he founded the Medical Care program which provided health care for those who were needy.

 
He successfully ran for the U.S. Senate seat that was held by George L. Radcliffe in 1946, and retired in 1953, when he returned to the private practice of law. He was 63 when he died in 1960, and was buried in New Cathedral Cemetery.

Quoted from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bal-oconor-20031209,0,1906444.photo

MD Historical Society Photos

Here’s another great Baltimore-centric website I’ve come across; it’s run by the former curator of photographs of the  Maryland Historical Society. It consists completely of photographs of buildings or street scenes in Baltimore and the surrounding areas. Many times, the old photos are juxtaposed next to current views of the same location. Check it out:

http://mdhsphotographs.tumblr.com/

Ghosts of Baltimore

I just had to share this site that my sister recently sent me to: Ghosts of Baltimore. This blog is full of old photos, maps, interesting news articles and tidbits about Baltimore’s history (not about haunted places in Baltimore, which is what I originally thought, haha). Content for the posts is dug up from the depths of The Smithsonian, the Library of Congress, the Baltimore Sun, and various other collections. Most posts are short and sweet, being picture heavy with optional text – just what I like for my historical eye candy.

A few posts that I found interesting:

Baltimore History Traced in Street Names – why streets are named the way they are

Wild Italian Man Dances Naked in the Streets – 1907 (a lack of news that day, I guess)

1857 Map of the City and County of Baltimore – very cool for genealogy purposes – it shows the districts with, what I assume, the landowners/farms

Detailed Map of Guilford From 1926 – much of my dad’s side grew up in this area; has the plot layouts

Daniel Leven Wooters – A Womanizer?

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

Daniel L. Wooters, Sr.

This particular part of my grandmother’s side of the family (one of his daughters, Mary Cecelia, married into the Foard family) is a constant headache. And I still don’t think I have it completely figured out. You’ll see why…

Daniel Leven Wooters, Sr., was born about 1845 in Maryland. Over the course of his life, he constantly moved around and had multiple wives and many children. I think he may have had two wives at the same time, at one point, but I don’t know for sure. This is what I do know:

In 1862, he volunteered for the Home Guard in Denton, Maryland at the age of 17. In 1863, he  is listed on the Draft Registration list for military duty during the Civil War. On line 19, his information is listed as follows:

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

Draft registration records for Daniel Wooters

  • Residence: Denton
  • Name: Wooters, Danl
  • Age: 21
  • Color: White
  • Occupation: Soldier
  • Single
  • Place of Birth: MD
  • Former Military Service: 1st E.S. Regt
  • Remarks: In Service

On March 24, 1868 Daniel married Sarah Elizabeth Gibson (about 1849-1875) in St. Michael’s, Talbot County, Maryland. They had two children (this where is starts to get complicated – trying to figure out what child belongs to which wife): Ellen Virginia Wooters (1869-1952) and Mary Cecelia Wooters (1873-1935). On the 1870 census for Talbot County, Daniel’s occupation is listed as osytering. Living with them are possibley Sarah’s younger brothers, Richard, William, and Charles.

Sarah died in or about 1875. Daniel remarried not long after on February 17, 1876 to Mary J. Pocock (1857-?). She was 19, and he was 30. Their marriage was filed in Baltimore (unsure if that’s where is took place). Daniel is listed as widowed and his occupation is Stevedore (according to Wikipedia: Stevedore, dockworker, docker, dock laborer, wharfie, and longshoreman can have various waterfront-related meanings concerning loading and unloading ships, according to place and country).

In 1880, the lived at 20 Binney Street in Baltimore. The children listed with them are Mary C. (from previous marriage), Jenny (most likely this is Ellen Virginia; born about the same year [before Mary’s marriage to Daniel]), and Laura M. (born about 1879). Daniel is listed as a laborer and Mary as “working in house pickling.”

The next record I have of Daniel is the 1910 census. Here, he is married to Rose (born about 1880) and they live at 839 William Street, Baltimore. They had been married for 14 years (1896). The children listed on the census with them are: John Albert (born about 1901), Daniel Leven, Jr. (born 1904), Laura Irene (born about 1907), and William Henry (born about 1901). They also had Ethel and Rose Elizabeth (information provided by a descendant of Daniel who described him as a “scoundrel”).

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Residence of Daniel in 1920 (1920 Sherwood Avenue)

Daniel died January 11, 1920. He lived at 1920 Sherwood Avenue in Baltimore. He is listed as widowed on his death certificate and is buried in Mount Carmel Cemetery. His father is listed as Daniel R. Wooters and his mother is unknown.

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Death certificate for Daniel Wooters

Whether he had multiple wives at the same time is not known, but what I do know is that he remarried very quickly after his first wife’s death, he liked his wives young (19, 19, and 16 years old), and they don’t seem to have lived very long despite their youth. Hmmm….

I would love to be able to find death certificates or graves for his wives. It would be very interesting.