A Confederate POW

I came across this little gem of information last night, while doing some more digging into the maternal side of my family. It’s stuff like this that makes me love genealogy.

Isaac Beauchamp Gibson is the son of John Gibson and Sarah “Sally” Ann Acworth. He was born July 28, 1816 in Bay Hundred, Talbot County, Maryland. He died March 9, 1887 in the same location, living his whole life on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Isaac is the first ancestor (my 5th great grand uncle, according to Ancestry; related to the Wooters/Foard line) that I can definitively say was a Confederate sympathizer.

On November 28, 1861 he was taken prisoner the federal government for “assisting recruits for the Rebels to cross into Virginia.” He was held for a little over a month, and was released after taking an Oath of Allegiance.

I can find no evidence that he was a soldier in the Civil, so probably just a civilian doing what he thought was his civic duty.

A German in the Family?!

My grandmother always prided herself on her Irish heritage. As far as anyone knew, she was Irish through and through. Her house was decorated in shades of green, leprechauns and shamrocks scattered the window sills, and an Irish flag hung proudly out front. We grew up hearing stories of how her family was “lace-curtain” Irish and celebrating St. Patrick’s Day as the holiest day of the year. She is, unfortunately, no longer with us, but even if she was, I don’t think she would believe me if I told her she had German blood in her (and English too, for the record).

Jemima C. Mumper is my 4xgreat grandmother. She was born in Pennsylvania in about 1826 and was married to Peter A. Magers (this is where the English comes in). Jemima was the daughter of Abraham Mumper, Esq. and Mary Lerew. Abraham’s paternal grandparents were born in Ochsenbach, Baden-Württemberg, in what is now known as Germany. This area is located in south-west Germany, bordering France and Switzerland.

George Michael Mumper, also known as Jerg Michael Momber/Mannber, was born January 23, 1723. He immigrated to the new world in 1751. He married (whether before or after immigrating, I’m not sure) Anna Margretha, who was also born in Ochsenbach in about 1719. Together, they had two children, Michael and Anna Christina. George Michael died February 23, 1807 in Franklin, PA, outliving his wife who died August 15, 1795.

Abraham Mumper’s maternal side of the family are Burkholders, hailing from Switzerland, not far from the German border. I have not done much of my own research into this branch, so I will save this for another day.

But back to the Mumpers…The Mumpers were a prominent family in Pennsylvania, settling in the York county area. They had sizable farms and were involved in local politics and going-ons. Iron ore was discovered less than a mile away from on of the Mumper farms. I’m not going to get into details (mostly because I only skimmed the text) but if you want to read more, see The History of York County Pennsylvania.

Updates to Tree – Foard, Smallwood, Seymour

New edits and updates to the tree tonight:

William Richardson Foard, Jr.

  • Added: Residence in 1923 (1902 Sherwood Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1917 (808 Willow St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: WWI Draft card
  • Interesting to note: His birth year listed on WWI draft card (1894) is different than what is on his grave (1893) – I usually lean towards earlier records as the correct date, my theory being that the younger you are, the more likely you are to remember correct dates. Also, information on gravestones is given my a relative or friend and has a higher likelihood of being incorrect.

Edith Smallwood

  • Added: 1900 Census
  • Added: Husband (Frank Zepp) and child (Norman Zepp)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1912, 1921, 1928 (623 St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Middle name initial of “M”

Margaret Seymour

  • Added: 1870, 1900, 1910 Census
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1910 (406 Park Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Marriage date (1871)
  • Added: Occupation – pattern maker

New People Added:

  • Mary E. Seymour Brant
  • William W. Seymour
  • Mary A. Seymour
  • Ella Seymour
  • Estelle Seymour
  • John B. Seymour

To view more details, visit my Ancestry.com tree (link is on the right side column)

Unknown Children

I have a few pictures that I don’t know who is in them. All I know is that they are from my mom’s side of the family. I can roughly date this one to about 1905-1915, judging by the large hair bow (a very popular accessory for young girls, it seems, as I have quite a few photos of girls wearing these) and the…interesting…haircuts. The two oldest are girls, and a young boy stands in the middle. I would guess their ages to range from about 4-7 years old. 

If any of my relatives are reading this and know who they are, speak up!

Untitled-22 1 copy

A Country Divided – But Not a Family

I recently stumbled onto a new piece of information about an ancestor, William P. Cummings – even though he lived and died in Baltimore, he fought in the Civil war for Ohio. I have yet to figure out the reason for this, and I am sure there is one, but it gave me inspiration for a new post.

Listed below are the relative who I know enlisted and those who registered for the draft. Obviously, my family is not full of career soldiers as no one lasted longer than a year. I lied – I just found  new one. I’m sure there are still more to be discovered, but for now, here they are:

Enlistments:

  • JamesO’Conor (1829-1911) [direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 20 Oct 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Sep 1862
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company E, 1st Cavalry Regiment Maryland
  • William Peyton Cummings (1831-1901) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 19 Apr 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company F, Ohio 12th Infantry Regiment
  • John B.Thoms (1837-?) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 17 Jun 1861
    • Discharged: 10 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Ensign
    • Regiment: Company F, 15th New York Engineers
    • Resigned at Fairfax Seminary, VA
  • William Baker Smallwood (1843-1891) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 1861
    • Discharged: Sep 1865
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company A, 1st Maryland Light Artillery; Company B, Maryland Light Artillery

Draft Registration

  • James Joseph Lacy (1840-1913) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jun 1863
  • DanielWooters (1845-1920) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul-Aug 1863
    • Remarks: Currently in service in the 1st Eastern Shore Regiment (this regiment fought in Gettysburg)
  • Gabriel Schaffer
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul 1863
EDIT - 
7/31/14 11:16 PM - added William Baker Smallwood
8/1/14 11:42 PM - added Gabriel Schaffer

How many degrees of separation to FDR?

I’m not very good at figuring out how many degrees of separation there are between me and someone, but this one is definitely less than the required six degrees.

Pictured below is Herbert Romulus O’Conor with President Franklin D. Roosevelt, taken sometime in the 1940s. I always seem to come across new photos when using Google from time to time. This one is from the Baltimore Sun.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O'Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Major General Charles Macon Wesson, and Maryland Governor Herbert O’Conor at Aberdeen Proving Grounds

Maryland’s wartime governor, Herbert Romulus O’Conor, a Democrat (right), was the fourth Roman Catholic to be elected to the governorship and the first of Irish descent. He was born in 1896 in Baltimore and raised on Homewood Avenue in the old Irish 10th Ward.

 
He was a graduate of Loyola High School and, in 1917, from what is now Loyola University Maryland. After graduating from the University of Maryland Law School in 1920, O’Conor was appointed an assistant state’s attorney for Baltimore, and then served a decade as state’s attorney for Baltimore City.

 
In 1934, he was elected attorney general, and governor four years later, easily beating the incumbent Harry W. Nice. In addition to serving as the state’s leader during World War II, O’Conor initiated the construction of bridges over the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers as well as the purchase of the Claiborne-Annapolis ferry route.

 
O’Conor created the Commission on Post War Reconstruction in 1944, which conducted public works programs and built highways and public buildings. The next year, he founded the Medical Care program which provided health care for those who were needy.

 
He successfully ran for the U.S. Senate seat that was held by George L. Radcliffe in 1946, and retired in 1953, when he returned to the private practice of law. He was 63 when he died in 1960, and was buried in New Cathedral Cemetery.

Quoted from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bal-oconor-20031209,0,1906444.photo

MD Historical Society Photos

Here’s another great Baltimore-centric website I’ve come across; it’s run by the former curator of photographs of the  Maryland Historical Society. It consists completely of photographs of buildings or street scenes in Baltimore and the surrounding areas. Many times, the old photos are juxtaposed next to current views of the same location. Check it out:

http://mdhsphotographs.tumblr.com/