The Marriage of Salvatore Maggio and Maria Grazia Mortillaro

One of the hardest branches of my tree to research, I’ve found, is the Italians. Tracing them from the late 1800s in Baltimore isn’t a problem; it’s the immigration records and Italian records that give me trouble. Partly, it’s because I don’t speak Italian and partly because the records aren’t online or they aren’t indexed. The spelling of names is also inconsistent; names tend to become Americanized over time. Linking a Mary to a Maria is simple enough, but DiPaula…we know that it most likely was changed at the time of immigration, but what was it originally? DiPaola? DePaola? DePaolo? DiPaulis? Space or no space?

Cefalù, Italy

Cefalu, Italy

The one thing I do know is that most of my Italian ancestors came from Cefalù, Sicily. Recently, I discovered that the civil records for Cefalù were available online through Family Search. The problem is most aren’t indexed, the handwriting is hard to read, and they’re in Italian. It’s going to be a long process, but I was able to find the civil marriage record for one couple because I knew the year they were married and there was an index available luckily.

I was slightly disappointed that there wasn’t more new information in the record I didn’t already have, but I was elated nonetheless. Thanks to a couple of reference pages (Italian Genealogical Word List and Italian Marriage Document Translation), I was able to translate most of the marriage record.

Marriage record for Salvatore Maggio and Maria Grazia Mortillaro

Marriage record for Salvatore Maggio and Maria Grazia Mortillaro

In the year 1890, on the 15th of October, at 7:15 PM in the city hall of Cefalù, open to the public.

Before me [name of official, usually the mayor] an official of the civil registration, officially appeared personally:

1st Salvatore Maggio, unmarried, age 24, cobbler, born in Cefalù, resident of Cefalù, son of Vincenzo, resident of Cefalù, and Maria Culotta, resident of Cefalù.

2nd Maria Grazia Mortillaro, unmarried, age 18, housewife, born in Cefalù, resident of Cefalù, daughter of Luigi, resident of Cefalù, and Rosa Carnaggio, resident of Cefalù.

[block of text; formalities]

Witnesses:
Baimondo Vaccaro, 21, decorator
Matteo Marsiglia, 24, cobbler

[script; hard to read handwriting]

The new information I was able to gleam from this (other than beginning a hobby of learning Italian) was the date and location of the marriage, that Salvatore’s father’s name was Vincenzo, and (most importantly) everyone was from Cefalù, including the parents. So now I know to keep looking for more records from Cefalù.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

A happy St. Patrick’s Day to everyone! Especially to all my ancestors who made the long journey from Ireland in the 19th century:

  • John Bogue – arrived 1825, age 16, to Baltimore
  • Margaret (wife of Henry Bogue) – arrived 1825, age 43, to Baltimore
  • Mary Ann (wife of Nicholas Gorman) – arrived 1824-1826, age 26-28, from County Down to Baltimore
  • Nicholas Gorman – arrived 1827, age 48, from County Down to Baltimore
  • Henry Bogue – arrived after 1833, from County Fermanagh
  • John Cummings – arrived 1834, age 8, to Baltimore
  • Alexander Cummings (father of John Cummings) – arrived 1834, age 32, from County Tyrone to Baltimore
  • Mary McKuskey (mother of John Cummings) – arrived 1834, age 35, from County Tyrone to Baltimore
  • Thomas Leland (father of Mary Ellen Leland) – arrived after 1837, from Woodfield, Knockvicar, Co. Roscommon, Ireland
  • Mary Martin (mother of Mary Ellen Leland) – arrived after 1837
  • Patrick F. Collins – arrived before 1840, from County Cork
  • Dorothy “Dolly” Kelly (mother of James O’Conor) – arrived after 1840
  • Michael Loughran – arrived before 1842
  • Bridget Flanagan – arrived before 1842
  • Daniel Hurley – arrived before 1842
  • Maria Ann (wife of John Bogue) – arrived before 1845
  • James Lacy (father of James Joseph Lacy) – arrived 1847-1854, age 29-35, from Kilbrin, County Cork
  • James Joseph Lacy – arrived 1848, age 8, from County Cork to Baltimore
  • Mary Elizabeth Sheehan (mother of James Joseph Lacy) – arrived 1848, age 30, from County Cork to Baltimore
  • Sarah Lee Farrell – arrived 1849, age 9, from County Roscommon to Baltimore
  • Edward Francis Levelle – arrived in 1849, age 11
  • Rose McKeyley (grandmother of John Cummings) – arrived before 1850
  • Mary Josephine O’Connor – arrived 1850-1853, age 5-8, from County Cork
  • William Galvin – arrived 1850-57, age 24-31, from County Galway to Baltimore
  • James O’Conor – arrived 1852, age 23
  • Mary Ellen Leland – arrived 1853, age 16, from County Roscommon

For reference, the Great Famine lasted from 1845-1852, but there were previous failures of the potato crop:

  • 1821-1822 – Munster and Connaught
  • 1830-1831 – Counties Mayo, Donegal, and Galway
  • 1835 – Ulster
  • 1832-1834, 1836-1837, 1839, 1841, 1844 – general crop losses due to dry rot and curl

    The counties of Ireland

A Confederate POW

I came across this little gem of information last night, while doing some more digging into the maternal side of my family. It’s stuff like this that makes me love genealogy.

Isaac Beauchamp Gibson is the son of John Gibson and Sarah “Sally” Ann Acworth. He was born July 28, 1816 in Bay Hundred, Talbot County, Maryland. He died March 9, 1887 in the same location, living his whole life on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Isaac is the first ancestor (my 5th great grand uncle, according to Ancestry; related to the Wooters/Foard line) that I can definitively say was a Confederate sympathizer.

On November 28, 1861 he was taken prisoner the federal government for “assisting recruits for the Rebels to cross into Virginia.” He was held for a little over a month, and was released after taking an Oath of Allegiance.

I can find no evidence that he was a soldier in the Civil, so probably just a civilian doing what he thought was his civic duty.

A German in the Family?!

My grandmother always prided herself on her Irish heritage. As far as anyone knew, she was Irish through and through. Her house was decorated in shades of green, leprechauns and shamrocks scattered the window sills, and an Irish flag hung proudly out front. We grew up hearing stories of how her family was “lace-curtain” Irish and celebrating St. Patrick’s Day as the holiest day of the year. She is, unfortunately, no longer with us, but even if she was, I don’t think she would believe me if I told her she had German blood in her (and English too, for the record).

Jemima C. Mumper is my 4xgreat grandmother. She was born in Pennsylvania in about 1826 and was married to Peter A. Magers (this is where the English comes in). Jemima was the daughter of Abraham Mumper, Esq. and Mary Lerew. Abraham’s paternal grandparents were born in Ochsenbach, Baden-Württemberg, in what is now known as Germany. This area is located in south-west Germany, bordering France and Switzerland.

George Michael Mumper, also known as Jerg Michael Momber/Mannber, was born January 23, 1723. He immigrated to the new world in 1751. He married (whether before or after immigrating, I’m not sure) Anna Margretha, who was also born in Ochsenbach in about 1719. Together, they had two children, Michael and Anna Christina. George Michael died February 23, 1807 in Franklin, PA, outliving his wife who died August 15, 1795.

Abraham Mumper’s maternal side of the family are Burkholders, hailing from Switzerland, not far from the German border. I have not done much of my own research into this branch, so I will save this for another day.

But back to the Mumpers…The Mumpers were a prominent family in Pennsylvania, settling in the York county area. They had sizable farms and were involved in local politics and going-ons. Iron ore was discovered less than a mile away from on of the Mumper farms. I’m not going to get into details (mostly because I only skimmed the text) but if you want to read more, see The History of York County Pennsylvania.

Updates to Tree – Foard, Smallwood, Seymour

New edits and updates to the tree tonight:

William Richardson Foard, Jr.

  • Added: Residence in 1923 (1902 Sherwood Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1917 (808 Willow St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: WWI Draft card
  • Interesting to note: His birth year listed on WWI draft card (1894) is different than what is on his grave (1893) – I usually lean towards earlier records as the correct date, my theory being that the younger you are, the more likely you are to remember correct dates. Also, information on gravestones is given my a relative or friend and has a higher likelihood of being incorrect.

Edith Smallwood

  • Added: 1900 Census
  • Added: Husband (Frank Zepp) and child (Norman Zepp)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1912, 1921, 1928 (623 St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Middle name initial of “M”

Margaret Seymour

  • Added: 1870, 1900, 1910 Census
  • Added: Residence in 1895 (922 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1900 (908 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Residence in 1910 (406 Park Ave., Baltimore, MD)
  • Added: Marriage date (1871)
  • Added: Occupation – pattern maker

New People Added:

  • Mary E. Seymour Brant
  • William W. Seymour
  • Mary A. Seymour
  • Ella Seymour
  • Estelle Seymour
  • John B. Seymour

To view more details, visit my Ancestry.com tree (link is on the right side column)

Unknown Children

I have a few pictures that I don’t know who is in them. All I know is that they are from my mom’s side of the family. I can roughly date this one to about 1905-1915, judging by the large hair bow (a very popular accessory for young girls, it seems, as I have quite a few photos of girls wearing these) and the…interesting…haircuts. The two oldest are girls, and a young boy stands in the middle. I would guess their ages to range from about 4-7 years old. 

If any of my relatives are reading this and know who they are, speak up!

Untitled-22 1 copy

A Country Divided – But Not a Family

I recently stumbled onto a new piece of information about an ancestor, William P. Cummings – even though he lived and died in Baltimore, he fought in the Civil war for Ohio. I have yet to figure out the reason for this, and I am sure there is one, but it gave me inspiration for a new post.

Listed below are the relative who I know enlisted and those who registered for the draft. Obviously, my family is not full of career soldiers as no one lasted longer than a year. I lied – I just found  new one. I’m sure there are still more to be discovered, but for now, here they are:

Enlistments:

  • JamesO’Conor (1829-1911) [direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 20 Oct 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Sep 1862
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company E, 1st Cavalry Regiment Maryland
  • William Peyton Cummings (1831-1901) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 19 Apr 1861
    • Mustered Out: 18 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company F, Ohio 12th Infantry Regiment
  • John B.Thoms (1837-?) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 17 Jun 1861
    • Discharged: 10 Aug 1861
    • Rank: Ensign
    • Regiment: Company F, 15th New York Engineers
    • Resigned at Fairfax Seminary, VA
  • William Baker Smallwood (1843-1891) [brother of direct ancestor]
    • Union
    • Enlisted Date: 1861
    • Discharged: Sep 1865
    • Rank: Private
    • Regiment: Company A, 1st Maryland Light Artillery; Company B, Maryland Light Artillery

Draft Registration

  • James Joseph Lacy (1840-1913) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jun 1863
  • DanielWooters (1845-1920) [direct ancestor]
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul-Aug 1863
    • Remarks: Currently in service in the 1st Eastern Shore Regiment (this regiment fought in Gettysburg)
  • Gabriel Schaffer
    • State: Maryland (Union)
    • Registration: Jul 1863
EDIT - 
7/31/14 11:16 PM - added William Baker Smallwood
8/1/14 11:42 PM - added Gabriel Schaffer